The Emmys: Tatiana Maslany wins Best Actress

If you caught the Emmys last night, you saw our man Rami Malek win Best Actor in a Dramatic Series for Mr. Robot. Check out our post about the cinematography choices based on his handsome mug.

Rami Malek speaks as he accepts his Emmy for lead actor in a drama series.Tatiana Maslany, otherwise known as Tietany Moslin.

The award for Best Actress in a Dramatic Series went to Orphan Black’s Tatiana Masalany. The LA Times thinks we didn’t have them in our Emmy pool… Looks like we’re on the pulse, people.

Orphan Black boasts (now-Emmy-award winning) performances by many versions of Tatiana Maslany, stunning cinematography and fantastic writing. You can stream all four seasons on Amazon, where the first three seasons are free for Prime members. All episodes are also available for purchase on iTunes. Definitely binge-worthy.

Masalany’s performance is certainly impressive. Over the course of the series, she plays 11 clone characters with distinct personalities and mannerisms, and up to 6 on-screen simultaneously. Tatiana Masalany definitely rises to the challenge and has finally been rewarded with a well-deserved Best Actress Emmy. Check out this great interview with Tatiana about embodying so many characters in a complicated series. Congrats! And sweet dance moves!

As cinematography aficionados, we know there is definitely some cool tech happening there to make these multiple-Tatianas possible. Here are a couple videos about how they did it. Shout out to DP Aaron Morton, and VFX Supervisor Geoff Scott from Intelligent Creatures.

 

Shot on EPIC DRAGON: Mr. Robot

With the Emmys coming up this week, it’s high time to binge-watch those series you’ve been meaning to watch all year. If you haven’t caught Mr. Robot yet, it should definitely make your short list.

Shot on RED EPIC DRAGON with Cooke S5/i and Leica Summicron-C primes, the show tackles the challenging story subject of hacking, computers, and all manner of things that are pretty tough to shoot in an interesting way.

To toss in one more obstacle: much of the show relies on voiceover and internal monologues to tell the story. DPs Tod Campbell and Tim Ives rose to this challenge, setting and maintaining a dynamic look and feel that brings the high-stakes of the invisible to the screen.

 

 

It may have been this challenge that inspired creator Sam Esmail to put so much weight, import and attention to detail on the series’ look. I love this conversation between Campbell and Esmail from this great Vulture piece:

“In my phone interview with him for the job, he was like, ‘I want to do a lot of negative space. I really want to change this up,’” Campbell says. “I’d never met him before, and I was like, ‘I’m so sick and tired of directors coming in on episodes I’m shooting like, “Oh, I want it to look like House of Cards! I want it to look like blah blah blah!” Sam, we need to become the reference point everybody uses from now on. I want everybody to say, “I want it to look like Mr. Robot.”‘ He was like, ‘Oh shit, dude — you got the job.’”

Campbell even tailored his lens choice specifically for actor & star Rami Malek’s distinctive eyes and dreamy captivating face:

“We use Cooke S5s, which are more round than other lenses,” he says. “They really accentuate curves, and they help sculpt the face a little more. I chose those lenses because Rami’s eyes are so big, and so are a lot of the other characters’. Rami, Carly (Chaikin, Elliot’s fellow hacker Darlene), Portia (Doubleday, his co-worker and friend Angela) — all of the people we love have these big, giant, bulbous eyes. The one person who doesn’t is Tyrell (Wellick, the sinister young executive played by Martin Wallström); he’s got these deep-seated eyes. I asked Sam, ‘Did you do that on purpose?’ and he never really answered me.”*

 

 

The RED EPIC DRAGON does some heavy lifting throughout the series as well. Campbell often mixes strong color choices, available light, impractical practicals and just plain darkness to accompany the strikingly deliberate framing choices.

 

 

So put those tootsies up and settle in for a good binge sesh for this series boasting 6 Emmy noms this year.

Mr. Robot is streaming on USA’s site for subscribers, Season 1 streams free for Amazon Prime members and Season 2 is available for purchase streaming on Amazon as well.

Like that look? 3GR has the RED EPIC DRAGON available for rent, as well the new RED WEAPON DRAGON, Leica Summicron-C primes, a variety of Cooke lenses and lots more. Check out our current Rate Sheet or Build a Package on our site.

We’d love to hear from you! Leave your questions, comments or requests in the comments below.

In Production: Storaro to shoot Woody Allen’s Next Film

cinematography legends and woody allen

Woody Allen with Gordon Willis, Sven Nykvist, Harry Savides, Darius Khondji, Vilmos Zsigmond &  Vittorio Storaro

Vittorio Storaro is the latest addition to an impressive list of prestigious DPs Woody Allen has teamed up with throughout his career. Shooting begins this month in Los Angeles and New York on the 1930’s period piece, set to premiere in 2016.

Gordon Willis, Sven Nykvist, Harry Savides, Vilmos Zsigmond and Darius Khondji have each had a hand in the look of Woody Allen’s films throughout his career. Willis, often called the “Prince of darkness,” helped the prince of dark neurotic comedy establish his look – he shot eight of Allen’s most iconic films, including Annie Hall (1977), Manhattan (1979) and Stardust Memories (1980).

Allen’s most recent project with Khondji, Irrational Man, is still playing at a theater near you, and the rumors of his next release are already a’buzzin.  The film boasts an all-star cast befitting its ensemble director.

Jesse Eisenberg, Blake Lively, Bruce Willis, Kristen Stewart, Anna Camp, Paul Schneider, and many more are expected to don their depression-era best for this project.

 

Storaro-Style

Known for his striking use of color, Vittorio Storaro has lensed many visually stunning films for some pretty stellar directors. Francis Ford Coppola‘s Apocalypse Now (1979) influenced a generation of aspiring DPs and earned Storaro his first Academy Award for Cinematography.

Warren Beatty‘s epic, Reds (1981) won him a second Oscar, and their next movie together, Dick Tracy (1990) snagged a nomination that year.

Numerous collaborations with Bernardo Bertolucci (The Last Tango in Paris (1972), The Conformist (1970), The Sheltering Sky (1990), The Last Emperor (1987) – Oscar number 3!) showcase Storaro’s signature style of visual storytelling.

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Colors of the Storaro Rainbow

A champion for the universality of light and color, Storaro is known for assigning a look or a hue a particular emotive motif, utilizing the visual throughout a film’s story arc.

Storaro’s work often exemplifies the storytelling role cinematography itself can play in cinema. Don’t we all know someone who caught the cinematography bug after watching something he shot? The guy even has a set of Rosco Gels named after him.

 

So what will a Storaro/Allen collabo look like?

Is it likely that the upcoming film will receive such careful aesthetic consideration?

This will be the first time the two collaborate as Director/DP, but they have worked together once before. Woody Allen starred in Alfonso Arau’s Picking Up The Pieces (2000), which Storaro shot.

In the dark comedy, (which technically looks fine/unremarkable) Woody Allen plays a butcher who kills and dismembers his cheating wife, confessing his crimes to the local priest (David Schwimmer). Hijinks ensue.

Woody Allen and David Schwimmer in PICKING UP THE PIECES (2000)

Shocker – the movie was panned! Variety called it “a tawdry misfire of the lowest order…” ouch… Needless to say, it was something of a departure from Storaro’s usual arty fare.

Maybe the two bonded on set and came up with some fabulous idea that’s been 15 years in the making. Maybe Storaro has been concocting a whole new set of gels for comedy. Who knows. We can’t wait to see some images from the new project, and welcome any tips from those in the know.

Watch this space for updates – and in the meantime, check out Woody Allen’s earlier films shot by some of the most talented cinematographers out there (along with the dearly departed – RIP guys. We’ll always turn off one more light for you just when we think it’s dark enough.) And treat your eyeballs to some Storaro classico…

Apocalypse Now Redux is currently available streaming on Amazon Prime & The Conformist is on Netflix, along with Gordon Willis’ Annie Hall, Sven Nyqvist’s Another Woman.

…or just make yourself some popcorn, get your nerd on and re-watch Visions of Light. No judgement.

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Shot on EPIC M-X: “Fishing Without Nets” Released Online

20th Century Fox has released Fishing Without Nets, which first premiered at the Sundance Film Festival, online on all major digital platforms, including  iTunes, Google Play and Amazon

Shot by 3GR Featured Filmmaker Alex Diesnhof on RED Epic + RED Scarlet w/ Zeiss Super Speeds and Angenieux Optimo DP Zooms. Read more about how Alex shot the film on IndieWire.

Shot on RED ONE M-X: “Funeral Kings” on DVD + iTunes

The feature film “Funeral Kings”, written and directed by Kevin and Matthew McManus, is now available on iTunes and Amazon. Shot by DP Alex Disenhof on 3GR’s RED M-X w/ RED Pro Primes.