Shot on EPIC DRAGON: The Final Girls – Screening in Los Angeles

The NUART theater is hosting a special midnight screening of  The Final Girls this Friday, January 15th at 11:59 PM.

We hope you get a chance to check it out, and welcome your thoughts in our comments section below.

Shot by featured filmmaker Elie Smolkin and directed by Todd Strauss-Shulson, The Final Girls plays with visual and storytelling tropes of campy B-movie horror flicks. Shot on 3GRs Red Epic Dragon using our Angenieux zooms and Cooke s4s.

Like the look? Feel free to request a quote if you’re interested in renting this gear.

A modern-day group of friends enter the world of a 70’s B horror movie – and try to get out alive. The plot largely supports the jokes, but also delivers some legitimate edge-of-your-seat thrills and a solid hero(ine) story. Taissa Farmiga (American Horror Story) delivers a stellar performance as Max Cartwright, a shy teenager pulled into this surreal adventure that ends up a lot more personal than anyone could have imagined.

final girls

Spanning horror, comedy, period, spoof, thriller and drama, The Final Girls allowed Strauss-Shulson and Smolkin to borrow from a number of aesthetic genres. Check out the killer article on their motion-control sequence in Popular Mechanics!

The Final Girls stars Taissa Farmiga, Malin Akerman, Nina Dobrev, Thomas Middleditch, Adam DeVine and Angela Trimbur. It was released in the US on October 9th, 2015.

the final girls

Want to read more? There’s a great conversation about shooting the movie with cinematographer Elie Smolkin on Five Frames.

And Strauss-Schulson discusses his inspiration and influences for much of the aesthetic on Slash Film.

 

 

Shot on EPIC DRAGON: The Martian

New trailer for The Martian. Directed by Ridley Scott. Shot on RED EPIC DRAGON + Angenieux Optimo Zoom Lenses by cinematographer Dariusz Wolski.

The film, which is slated to be released on November 25th in 3D, stars Matt DamonJessica ChastainKristen WiigJeff DanielsMichael PeñaKate Mara, and Sean Bean.

Shot on EPIC M-X: “Fishing Without Nets” Released Online

20th Century Fox has released Fishing Without Nets, which first premiered at the Sundance Film Festival, online on all major digital platforms, including  iTunes, Google Play and Amazon

Shot by 3GR Featured Filmmaker Alex Diesnhof on RED Epic + RED Scarlet w/ Zeiss Super Speeds and Angenieux Optimo DP Zooms. Read more about how Alex shot the film on IndieWire.

Shot on EPIC M-X: Starry Eyes

 

Starry Eyeswritten and directed by Kevin Kölsch and Dennis Widmyer, will debut at SXSW saturday night as part of the Midnighters schedule. Judging by the teaser trailer, this should be a terrifying and fun watch! Shot by Adam Bricker on RED Epic + Angenieux Optimos.

 

If your in Austin for SXSW try to get there early for the world premier Saturday night at the Alamo Ritz. Film starts at 11:59PM

Shot on EPIC M-X: Disenhof talks “Fishing Without Nets”

Fishing Without Nets

Fishing Without Nets has played at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival to rave reviews (Variety, Hollywood Reporter, Grantland). The film was shot by 3GR featured-filmmaker Alex Disenhof on RED Epic + RED Scarlet w/ Angenieux Optimo DP Zooms and Zeiss Super Speeds. Disenhof discussed the filming process with IndieWire as part of the “How I Shot That” series.

Which camera and lens did you use? We used the Red Epic and Red Scarlett cameras with Zeiss Super Speeds and Angenieux Optimo DP 16-42mm, and 30-80mm zooms.

What was the most difficult shot in your movie, and how did you pull it off? We had many difficult shots, as we often did ten minute long handheld takes looking 360 degrees. Possibly the most difficult of all was shooting handheld on a rickety wooden boat deep out at sea. I had to follow several ‘pirates’ as they grabbed their weapons and jumped overboard into small skiffs. We were almost 30 miles out in a very rough Indian Ocean, so it was extremely difficult to stay upright, especially with a camera on my shoulder. I was able to get all the angles I needed, bouncing off my gaffer and key grip as they pushed me one way and another to keep me on my feet as the boat swayed heavily from side to side. Additionally, my key grip had a body harness attached to me and tied me to the mast of the ship so that I wouldn’t fall overboard! It was like shooting on a roller-coaster that never stopped!

Who is your favorite cinematographer, and why? I have so many! If I had to name one, recently, I’ve really enjoyed the work of Sean Bobbitt, BSC. His handheld camerawork and simple, straightforward approach to lighting is something I really admire. Every movie he does is an immersive, textured and energetic visual experience.

What’s the best film school for an aspiring cinematographer? Working on set is the best film school! I went to Emerson College and thoroughly enjoyed my experience there, but the best way to learn cinematography is to shoot and watch other cinematographers shoot. Have an open mind, don’t be afraid to admit you don’t know something and always try something new.

Do you think the shift from digital is good or bad? I think the shift from film to digital isn’t good or bad – it just is what it is, and it isn’t going to stop. I’ll use either when it is appropriate, and I enjoy shooting both for very different reasons. I think digital is a great tool, and should be treated as that – another tool in a filmmaker’s tool belt.

What advice do you have for cinematographers who want to get to Sundance? Seek out projects you believe in and find good collaborators. I wouldn’t be at Sundance if it weren’t for the people I worked with to make this project happen!

What’s the best career advice you received? First and foremost: it’s not a race. Enjoy the whole journey and be proud of yourself even when things aren’t going your way. Not everybody has the courage to follow their dreams.